2013-11-07 / Lifestyles

Hospice ‘bells’ gathering sheds light on services


Above, community members participate in the “Bells for Hospice” gathering at Triangle Park Friday. The bell-ringing ceremony marked the beginning of National Hospice and Home Care Month. 
Pioneer Tribune photo Above, community members participate in the “Bells for Hospice” gathering at Triangle Park Friday. The bell-ringing ceremony marked the beginning of National Hospice and Home Care Month. Pioneer Tribune photo MANISTIQUE – On Nov. 1, community members gathered in Triangle Park to usher in National Hospice and Home Care Month with “Bells for Hospice”.

Schoolcraft Memorial HomeCare and Hospice and North Woods Home Care and Hospice hosted the gathering.

“We still have a way to go before all people realize the benefits hospice has to offer those living with life limiting illnesses, but looking at the turnout, it’s obvious that families are enthusiastic about sharing the news,” said Kristin Peterson, director of Schoolcraft Memorial HomeCare and Hospice.

“Beyond the management of physical symptoms, it is the personal touch we are most often thanked for.”

Peterson is reminding residents that hospice benefits don’t abruptly end with the death of a loved one either.

“An aftercare benefit is the bereavement follow up … to families for thirteen months,” she said. “This is tailor-made to meet individual needs in grief but can consist of monthly mailings, visits, phone calls and on-going support.”

A workgroup offering “Good Grief” support sessions are held three times a year at Schoolcraft Memorial Hospital.

“One of the barriers we fight is the myth that hospice is a death sentence,” Peterson said. “Nothing could be further from the truth. Hospice, at its core, is a celebration and reverence for life.”

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