2013-08-15 / Views

Letters

Dear Editor,

My mother and father in-law have generously gave many contributions of time and monies to the Schoolcraft Humane Society. My husband John found a litter of kittens in an old outhouse that his grandfather had built before toilets on Aug.7. The mother cat had either got hit by a car or wolves ate her. They were in need of help, there was five left alive, two little black ones were in rough shape. They needed more help than I could give, the three little yellow ones were eating from a dropper for me and my husband. So I brought the litter to the Humane Society to help them. Well that was a mistake. I went there and the lady at the desk told me I had to get out and wait for her outside. She was extremely rude. She told the other lady to put the kittens in her back seat of her Suburban. The windows were rolled up all the way and it was hot outside. It was a couple of minutes after 12:30 p.m., I live across the road. I sat on my mother-in-law’s porch and waited and watched until 1:30 p.m. when I had to leave. She never took them to the vet until later. Well I guess they weren’t cute enough and not clean enough for her. I went to the vet’s the next morning to check on condition. Well they had put them all to sleep. I told them I wanted them to try save a couple and my husband was going to want one back.

I guess Mr. Tony Demboski was right. All they care about is money. We will no longer be donating any more money to this location and we wish to let George and Margorie’s friends know we no longer wish people to donate any money there in their names because they don’t care about ugly, dirty helpless critters as they claim they do.

Thank you,

Blanche Hursh-Rasmussen

Manistique

Dear Editor,

I’d like to take this opportunity to tell the classmates of 1953 how happy I was to see them at our 60th reunion. It was so great to be with you. A good time was had by all. Memories were shared, as were many smiles.

Until next time, enjoy life – you’re a great bunch of people.

P.S. Thanks to Janet and Liz for the organizing of our get together.

As ever,

Jean Selling

To the Editor:

The Eva Burrell Animal Shelter is committed to responsible and compassionate action on behalf of the cats and dogs that find temporary refuge with us. EBAS has always been a “quality of life” shelter which means that every possible and reasonable effort is made to assure a shelter animal a chance for placement with a responsible individual or family. The effort includes veterinary care, a clean and safe shelter environment, training and socialization. Our goal is to provide a safe and healthy animal which will be a valued companion to adoptive clients. Because of dedication to this goal, the EBAS adoption rate is stellar, averaging over 90 percent for the past several years.

Animal issues are emotionally charged, and occasionally someone finds displeasure with our efforts. Sadly, not all animals brought to the shelter can be salvaged. Some are too far gone by the time they arrive at the shelter. They have been abandoned, neglected or abused for too long and their behaviors and/or health are beyond correction. In these instances, compassion and mercy are the last remaining options. Such decisions are never made lightly and are carried out with dignity and sorrow.

EBAS strives to improve the quality of life for pets. We have many programs in place which speak to this commitment – quality care for animals at the shelter, low cost spay/neuter programs, training classes, assistance with behavioral issues, food and winter bedding straw - to mention a few. We are advocates for the animals that have no voice or choice, and strongly feel that it is our responsibility to offer the best chance possible for successful adoptions of safe and healthy cats and dogs.

Char Crosby and Victoria

George co-presidents, Eva Burrell

Animal Shelter

Dear Editor,

On Aug. 8, 2013, the Pioneer Tribune published a front page news article which incorrectly stated that Cloverland Electric Cooperative was seeking a “new fee” which would “add a monthly facility charge to bill.”

The monthly facility charge is an itemized charge on electric bills today. The facility charge is similar to the monthly charge billed by phone and cable providers for basic service. It covers the fixed costs to have the service available. Some examples of our fixed costs include poles, wires, transformers, line equipment, property taxes and tree trimming.

For many years, electric utilities included a portion of these fixed costs in their per kilowatt-hour charge. In doing so, the revenue collected through the energy charge to cover these costs was dependent on kilowatt-hour sales which fluctuate with changes in weather, economic conditions, energy efficiency efforts, and lifestyle patterns. Our rate filing submitted to the Michigan Public Service Commission on August 5 seeks to introduce one set of costbased rates for our cooperative and increase the monthly facility charge to recover our fixed costs. In doing so, our co-op can better plan and manage operations when the revenue needed to provide for these costs is not dependent on kilowatt-hour sales.

We invite you, our member-owners, to attend a co-op information meeting at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, October 9 in Manistique High School’s auditorium. We will review our rate restructuring filing, cost of service study and scheduled projects for improved system reliability. If you are unable to attend, we will provide updates on www.cloverland.com and publish more information in your membership magazine, Michigan Country Lines.

Wendy Malaska

Director of Communications and Member Services

Cloverland Electric

Cooperative

Dear Editor,

Earlier this year, the U.S. Senate passed a commonsense immigration reform measure in a strongly bipartisan fashion. This was an important step in the right direction – especially for producers, farm workers and rural communities.

The historic legislation passed by the Senate provides a pathway to earned citizenship for the 11 million people who are in our country today without authorization. They will have to go to the back of the line, pay fines and settle taxes they owe our nation.

It would modernize the system that we use to bring skilled workers into the United States. And it would put in place the toughest border security plan that America has ever seen – building on steps that have reduced illegal border crossings to their lowest level in decades.

The non-partisan Congressional Budget Office found that the Senate bill would reduce the deficit over the next 20 years by nearly $850 billion, and the Social Security Administration estimates that this immigration bill would add nearly $300 billion to the Social Security system in the next decade.

This bill is also important for rural America. Recently, the White House economic team released a new report highlighting the positive economic benefits that commonsense immigration reform would provide for agriculture and rural communities.

The report highlights research showing that without a stable workforce, America’s record agricultural productivity will decline in coming years. In Michigan, for example, eliminating the immigrant labor force would cost more than $151 million in short-term production losses.

The Senate bill addresses this concern by taking much-needed steps to ensure a stable agricultural workforce, and a fair system for U.S. producers and farm workers. In particular, it would give qualifying farm workers an expedited path to earned citizenship, as long as they continue to work in agriculture. A new temporary worker program would replace the current H-2A visa program over time, and allow farm workers a three-year visa to work year-round in any agricultural job.

This commonsense system wouldn’t just prevent a decline in production – it would grow the economy. Research highlighted in the White House report projects that an expanded temporary worker program would increase both production and exports across our agriculture sector.

Under the Senate proposal, USDA would play a greater role in implementing farm labor programs and ensuring that farmers and ranchers have all the information they need. As Congress continues to work on this issue, Secretary Vilsack and all of us at USDA are committed to working with lawmakers to be sure they have any technical assistance they might need to finalize these proposals.

Immigration reform is very important for farmers, farm workers and communities across rural America. The majority of our agriculture workforce is made up of immigrants, and their hard work has helped America’s farmers and ranchers lead the world. To remain competitive and keep driving economic growth in rural America, we need rules that work. Rural America needs Congress to act as soon as possible to carry forward the work of the U.S. Senate and fix today’s broken immigration system.

Christine White

State Executive Director

Michigan Farm Service Agency

USDA

Return to top

ON MEDICARE; THEY ARE PEOPLE

ON MEDICARE; THEY ARE PEOPLE LIKE YOUR PARENTS GROWN OLD. THE VETERN WHO PUT HIS LIFE ON HOLD, WENT OFF TO FIGHT, TO GIVE YOU FREEDOM. THE TEACHER WHO DEVOTED THEIR LIFE TO HELP YOU GET AHEAD. YOUR GRANDPARENTS OR SOMEONES LOVED ONE OLD AND NOW FORGOTTEN. WE SHOULD BE ASHAMED THAT NOW WHEN THEY NEED OUR HELP TO EXIST THE COUNTY DOESNT CARE..INSTEAD WE HAVE THEM WORRIED IF TOMORROW COMES WILL THEY HAVE A ROOF OVER THEIR HEAD. WE SHOULD NOW FORGET HOW MUCH THEY GAVE IN THEIR TIME,PUT THEM OUT ALONE IN THE WOODS FOR THE WOLVES AS THEY ONCE DID LONG AGO WITH THEIR OLD ONES. IT IS TIME TO REMEMBER WHAT THEY GAVE US ALL IN THE PAST SO THAT YOU CAN LIVE THE LIFE YOU DO NOW. "IF NOT FOR THEM THERE WOULD BE NO US" AND BY EXAMPLE TEACH OUR YOUNG THAT MERCY IS ITS OWN REWARD. BECAUSE FOR MAKE NO MISTAKE. "WHAT COMES AROUND GO'S AROUND" AND YOU TOO WILL GROW OLD.

Poll

Do you agree with the Schoolcraft County Board of Commissioner's decision not to support the DNR land acquisition in Hiawatha Township?